UK Security Services may have just made a MAJOR slip up in the Salisbury Poisoning case

According to reports today, a cat and two guinea pigs belonging to Sergei Skripal – the double agent poisoned in Salisbury along with his daughter Yulia in March – have died after police reportedly sealed them in Mr Skripal’s house during the initial investigation. However, in what may amount to a major slip-up by the UK Security Services, reports from shortly after the poisoning indicate that police were fully aware that the pets were inside the house.

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Mr Skripal and his daughter Yulia initially fell ill on March 4th, but a report from March 17th claimed that Mr Skripal’s “vet contacted police immediately after hearing he had collapsed” and that a “cat and two guinea pigs [had] been taken away for tests”.

Mr Skripal owned an extremely rare black Persian cat which he reportedly paid £1500 for, and had also spent more money bringing the rare feline and two guinea pigs over from Russia to the UK.

In March Mr Skripal’s vet, Howard Taylor, said he had phoned police to warn them about the pets, telling The S*n:

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We phoned the police on day one to offer to help if they needed it.

I thought it unlikely the police would have gone to the house and not done anything

Howard went on to say that Mr Skripal was “a nice chap and we got on well.” adding that “He never said he was in fear for his life. He used the vets for some years and I had seen his cat and his guinea pigs.

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In light of reports today that Mr Skripal’s pets have now died after reportedly being sealed inside the house, the revelation that police were told about the animals almost immediately after the incident had occurred throws up huge questions about the Security Services’ handling of the case.

This is either a case of gross incompetence, or is something deeper possibly at play?

You decide.

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